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Non-Fiction Book Reviews

Listed below are our most recent book reviews for Non-Fiction books. To view additional book reviews, choose a subcategory from the list on the left.

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Not My Father's Son: A Memoir

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Cumming, Alan(2014)Recently Added Review
Not My Father's Son: A Memoir

In 2010, award-winning actor Alan Cumming appears on the British television show “Who Do You Think You Are,” a show that researches the genealogy of its subjects. Excited for information about the mysterious life and death of his maternal grandfather, Cumming receives a shocking phone call from his father just before filming begins that throws his personal and public life into turmoil. While publicly appearing on the show and discovering his grandfather`s secret life, Cumming privately wrestles with his father’s revelations and revisits the horrific abuse his father inflicted on him as a child. Written in a direct style with grace and humor, Cumming’s memoir is a powerful story of family secrets and personal triumph.

Reviewed by Bobbie M., Independence Regional

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If I Did It: Confessions of the Killer

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Simpson, O. J.(2007)Recently Added Review
If I Did It: Confessions of the Killer

In his own voice, O.J. recounts the details, circumstances and events of June 13, 1994 when Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman were brutally murdered outside her condo in Brentwood, CA. At once chilling and disturbing, you won’t know whether it`s a journal or a shocking confession. Touted as a “fictional account” and much criticized by the media when first released, the book is by no means a “true” confession. It allows us a mere glimpse into the lives of O.J. and Nicole as they struggled through marital problems, child custody battles and the glamorous world of the rich and famous they inhabited prior to the murders. You`ll learn new facts that were not released during the trial and hear O.J.`s private thoughts on the killings.

Reviewed by Alex O., Main Library

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Dancing with Myself

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Idol, Billy(2014)Recently Added Review
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Dancing with Myself

The punk pedigree of William Michael Albert Broad, a.k.a. Billy Idol, is unquestionable. But while American audiences could not relate to the political angst of his comrades, the Sex Pistols, Billy Idol has engaged U.S. fans for decades. In his autobiography, Dancing with Myself, Idol chronicles the tour de force that was born of his intuitive talent, coupled with his acumen to surround himself with top-notch musicians and production teams. Idol`s memoir is conversational and friendly, making no excuses for his episodes of addiction and other assorted bad behavior, publically apologizing to his mates and colleagues many times. Despite close calls, like the title of his fourth studio album, Idol has undoubtedly enjoyed a `Charmed Life`.

Reviewed by Lydia T., Main Library

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The First Family Detail:Secret Service Agents Reveal the Hidden Lives of the Presidents

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Kessler, Robert(2014)Recently Added Review
The First Family Detail:Secret Service Agents Reveal the Hidden Lives of the Presidents

The last legislation Lincoln signed into law on the day of his assassination opened a new division of the Treasury Department dedicated to counteracting counterfeiting: The Secret Service. Lincoln had no professional protection at Ford’s Theatre. His lone detective left for a drink at a nearby bar. Despite that tragedy, and the assassinations of Garfield and McKinley, true presidential protection came slowly. Kessler traces that history and the decisions that handicapped the agency in its efforts to safeguard JFK in Dallas and Reagan in DC., although he focuses primarily on the inner workings of more recent administrations. For most considerate and appreciative Bush 41 ties with his daughter-in-law, Laura. To discover whose detail all agents dread you’ll just have to check out the book!

Reviewed by Rita L., Independence Regional

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Carsick: John Waters Hitchhikes Across America

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Waters, John(2014)Recently Added Review
Carsick: John Waters Hitchhikes Across America

“I’m Not Psycho” says the sign John Waters holds to hitchhike cross-country. The sixty-six year old cult film director once referred to as the “Pope of Trash” is unsure if anyone will pick up the odd looking man with the pencil mustache. In two fictional tales, Waters imagines the best and worst case travel scenarios, vignettes as hilarious and twisted as his movies. In real life, Waters is genuinely surprised and touched by the more normal, but no less interesting drivers he encounters on the road. Even Waters couldn’t predict that he would become great friends with a twenty-year old young Republican he nicknames the “Corvette Kid.” A surprising portrait of both the author and America, Carsick is an engaging travel memoir.

Reviewed by Bobbie M., Independence Regional

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